maternal mortality

2016 November

How a simple skipping rope changed lives

2016-12-14T14:19:18+00:00 November 12th, 2016|Categories: Hamilton Spectator, Newspaper columns|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

(The Hamilton Spectator - Saturday, November 12, 2016) KAMPALA, UGANDA ✦ It started with a skipping rope, a plain green skipping rope, the kind you’d find at any dollar store. It was a simple investment. You’d be forgiven for opting to instead spend the money on your morning double-double.

2015 December

Caught between health care and (the worst parts of) religion

2017-07-18T01:43:07+00:00 December 12th, 2015|Categories: New Vision, Newspaper columns|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

(The New Vision - Saturday, December 12, 2015) MUKONO, UGANDA ✦ She questioned if having the surgery was “God’s will,” but the truth is that she was afraid and misguided and besides her own safety, she was leaving her unborn child’s life to hang dangerously in the balance.

2015 November

Fear and childbirth in Uganda

2017-07-18T01:48:18+00:00 November 12th, 2015|Categories: Daily Dad|Tags: , , , , , , |2 Comments

It’s morning and the sun is up, shining on the mud, and Zak, the dog, has left his bright orange ball to chase Tiblets. Tibs, as Liz is fond of calling him, is the poor cat who just took off into the bush. There is another way, though, and one of our cats, Mister Bubbles, [...]

2015 November

A gala you won’t forget. A prayer (I hope) you remember.

2017-07-18T01:59:02+00:00 November 6th, 2015|Categories: Daily Dad|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Before you read today’s post, please set aside a few minutes to view this remarkable link. It’s on the war (and it is a war) of maternal death in places like sub-Saharan Africa. Then take a few minutes to read the rest of this post, and, if you’re inclined, you’ll need a minute or two [...]

2014 May

Headline: Airliner filled with mothers vanishes. No, really – where have all the mothers gone?

2017-07-19T01:13:51+00:00 May 28th, 2014|Categories: Daily Dad|Tags: , , , , , , |1 Comment

The country knows when a mother loses one child for a short while during an outrageous hospital abduction. And the entire world knows when an airliner leaves Malaysia and then vanishes mysteriously. But what about when mother upon mother lose their newborns? Or an airliner full of mothers goes down? It happened yesterday. Did you hear? And today. [...]

2014 May

A job that’s not for the faint of heart

2017-07-19T01:20:37+00:00 May 11th, 2014|Categories: Daily Dad|Tags: , , , , , |4 Comments

Liz: Dad, I have a riddle for you. Okay. Liz: You have to guess what it is. Uhuh. Liz: This is a job. It's a job where you work all the time. You can never get any rest from it.  You just keep going all the time. Right. Liz: Yeah, it’s 24-7. Especially at first. You have to work [...]

2014 March

Hey Little Jeannie. You’ve got so much love. (And I’m a better man for it.)

2017-07-19T01:31:09+00:00 March 27th, 2014|Categories: Daily Dad|Tags: , , , , , |10 Comments

The truth is that if it wasn’t for My Bride, I’d be living on some deserted island hunting wild boar and eating coconuts and running around a fire as crazy as the Mad Hatter. But she rescued me from that life some time ago and brought me to Yemen. (YEMEN! of all places.) And now, [...]

2014 February

The long rollercoaster ride of one Ugandan adoption

2015-01-13T19:08:16+00:00 February 15th, 2014|Categories: New Vision, Newspaper columns|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

(The New Vision - Saturday, February 15, 2014) MUKONO, UGANDA ✦ There’s new joy in our Mukono home these days. Our Ugandan daughter, Hannah, is now legally in our family. She danced when we showed her the formal adoption paper. This, after waiting more than 500 days. That’s five hundred. Welcome to the world of international adoptions where you need the patience of Job to slog through it all. Adopting a child, especially in Uganda, can be this much of a roller coaster ride. In our case, we’re Canadians in Uganda since 2005. My wife and I met Hannah in 2009, when she was three, in a Jinja orphanage. When she was barely larger than a cat, she had been found abandoned in an Mbarara hospital. Her family? Unknown.